Marketing Torture to the Masses

I often start my day with and from Andrew Sullivan’s “The Dish” because Dr. Sullivan channels the not-so-late George Orwell.  This morning “rewarded” my following Dr. Sullivan with revelations of the “neglected beauty of the obvious” [O. W. Holmes II].

First, please behold the elegance of tweets:  http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2014/12/11/an-orwellian-acronym/ .  To me the most important point is that journalists should be challenged every time they use “Enhanced Interrogation Techniques” or deploy the phrase’s acronym, “EIT.”  Content-consumers should challenge content-conveyors who use the term or who permit the term to be used without challenge.\

The content-conveyors will not change their behavior.  Our betters and rulers grant interviews on the presumption that their lies, evasions, and other marketing will not be challenged.  An interviewer who does not toady will not be granted access to “the best gets,” the interviewees who attract consumers to advertising.

Rather, the point follows the end of Mr. Orwell’s essay, “Politics and the English Language.”

     … one can at least change one’s own habits, and from time to time one can even, if
one jeers loudly enough, send some worn-out and useless phrase … into the dustbin where it belongs.

I suggest that we each and all jeer the phrase “Enhanced Interrogation Techniques” off our screens.  If torturers would defend torture, make them call it torture,

Please note in addition that the tweets insist that conveying “EIT” or “Enhanced Interrogation Techniques” is not objective journalism.  It is collusion in masking horrors.  It makes content-conveyors and content-consumers accomplices after the fact.

It does not, however, defame the United States of America or us the people.  As Dr. Sullivan notes — http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2014/12/12/americas-history-of-torture/ — Peter Beinart of The Atlantic has posted “Torture is Who We Are” http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/12/torture-is-who-we-are-cia-report/383670/ to argue that torture is hardly rare in U. S. history, culture, and conquest.  It is part of our identity. Sensible Americans may dispute how great or small that part of our identity might be.  However, one’s ticket to that dispute is candor.  Admit the tortures.

I am always cheered whenever someone advocates our cutting the bullshit.

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